My Journey to Mumbai India

“whether you love India or hate India”, that`s what I heard before I traveled to India. Mumbai was first destination, the airplane landed there. we had 5 days for Mumbai and for my opinion its enough unless you want to explore it more deeply. The Purpose of the visit was to know more about my parents roots’ where they live, how they spent their childhood and more.


Gate of India in Mumbai 

we start our journey in gate of India, the historical monument and the most recognized monument, the Gateway of India, was constructed to commemorate the visit of King George V and Queen Mary to the city. The looming Gateway is designed to be the first thing that visitors see when approaching Mumbai by boat. It’s also a popular place to start exploring Mumbai. These days the atmosphere around the monument resembles a circus at times, with numerous vendors peddling everything from balloons to Indian tea.

Heritage Buildings

Mumbai has some captivating heritage buildings where you can marvel over staggering examples of intricate colonial architecture. Some of the best are the Gothic looking Prince of Wales Museum in the Kala Ghoda art precinct, Victoria Terminus (CST) railway station, the Bombay High Court and the buildings of Horniman Circle in the Fort area. The feature of Horniman Circle is its huge gardens, which provide a welcome respite from the hustle and bustle of the city. Also have a wander past the historic 18th century homes in Khotachiwadi village.

Mahalaxmi Dhobi Ghat

This massive open air laundry provides an unforgettable glimpse into the inside of the city. Dirty laundry from all over Mumbai is brought here and painstakingly hand washed by the dhobis (washermen) in the seemingly endless rows of concrete troughs. The thousands of dhobis spend hours every day standing up to their knees in water filled with chemicals, manually scrubbing and beating the dirt out of each item of laundry.
Further, we went to the elphanta island, small island with alot of monkeys and temple.

Haji Ali

The imposing Haji Ali is both a mosque and tomb. It was built in 1431 by wealthy Muslim merchant and Sufi saint Pir Haji Ali Shah Bukhari, who was inspired to change the course of his life after going to Mecca. It also contains his body. Situated in the middle of the ocean, Haji Ali is only accessible during low tide from a narrow, 500 yard long walkway.

Bollywood

Mumbai is the center of India’s booming “Bollywood” film industry. The architecturally resplendent Eros Cinema, adjacent to the Churchgate railway station, is a great place to take in a Bollywood movie. Alternatively, it’s possible to go on a tour to the heart of the action in Film City. Or if you’d rather be in a Bollywood movie than simply see the set of one, that’s possible too!

Elephanta Caves

Although they’re nowhere near as impressive as Maharashtra’s famous Ajanta and Ellora caves, the ancient rock-cut caves on Elephanta Island are worth visiting if you’re spending a few days in Mumbai. There are two groups — one Buddhist and one Hindu. The massive main cave, devoted to Lord Shiva, became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987. It has some impressive sculptures and artwork. Get there by taking a ferry from the Gateway of India. If you want to venture further afield, there are more Buddhist caves inside Sanjay Gandhi National Park on the northern outskirts of the city.

Juhu Beach

Probably one of the most visited places in Mumbai, Juhu Beach is situated in Ville Parle. Juhu Beach comes to life mostly in the evening, when people from all walks of life visit here to enjoy sunset, play in the water and treat their taste buds with street food like Bhel Puri and Pav Bhaji.

Banganga Tank

Banganga Tank is one of the prominent tourist attractions in Mumbai. It forms a part of Walkeshwar temple complex in Malabar Hill. As the water in the tank is regarded as the subsidiary of Holy Ganges, it is considered sacred and is believed to have healing powers. The tank is visited by thousands who wish to take a dip in the holy water and offer flowers at the Banganga Temple.

Marine Drive

Known as Marine Drive, this tourist spot has also been called Sonapur by the locals of the city. Marine Drive is a 3km long stretch that links Nariman Point to Babulnath, and is situated at the foot of Malabar Hill. Large crowds of people come to this place to stride along the walkway and to view the setting sun at dusk.Marine Drive is also referred to as ‘Queen’s necklace’, because the street lights make the road look like a string of pearls and create an illusion of a necklace, when viewed at night from an elevated point. Towards the northern end of Marine Drive lies one of the oldest beaches in Mumbai, Chowpatty Beach, which is famous for its bazaars and fast food and snacks such as Bhel Puri, Paav Bhaji, etc.

 

Author: Eden

Travel Agent